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Building Green – Chris Jafarieh

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Sick Buildings

We spend most of our waking hours, in fact, most of our lives, inside buildings – schools, offices apartments. What many don’t realize is that this time spent inside is making us sick. There is a term called Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). SBS describes the situation where the time people spend in a particular structure, results in symptoms of poor health for its residents.

There is also an impact on the surrounding environment. Poorly designed and poorly maintained buildings are responsible for almost 50% of carbon emissions.

Modern, mass-produced building materials that emit volatile organic chemicals (VOC’s), combustion pollutants from poorly maintained heating systems, bioaerosols from inadequate moisture control, poorly designed ventilation systems, heavy metals in the paint of older buildings, and toxic cleaning supplies are a few of the causes of bad air quality and illness.

Green Diamond Builders

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Chris Jafarieh is the co-founder of Green Diamond, a division of Blaqk Diamond Group. He is making both the moral and business case for buildings that are cleaner and more sustainable. He believes that buildings should be designed and operated to reduce the overall impact of the built environment on human health and the natural environment

There will always be a need for more housing and more office buildings. Doesn’t it make sense to bring more light, air, and sustainable practices to these spaces? The answer is, it does. From both a business and health sense.

A Sick Home Means A Sick Family -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

The problem is that real estate investors, architects, builders and residents are different stakeholders with different interests. For the investors, many of which are hedge funds, the internal rate of return is the most important aspect of the building process. How that building will impact the health of its residents and of the community 5,10, or 20 years from when it’s completed is not usually part of the design and construction process.

Chris has created a financial model that allows builders to create structures where design, location, rain capture, raw materials, energy usage, and waste consumption all enter into the equation.

LEED-certified green buildings, green hold their value better than conventional construction. When owners resell them, green buildings are 40% more valuable per square foot.

Bringing The Outside In

There is growing demand for making sustainability a part of the building process. But it needs to happen more quickly. Employees, consumers, tenants, and neighborhood residents must all demand that the spaces they’re working in and living around, should be green. When we say “green,” we are talking about buildings that replicate, as close as possible, the benefits of being outside.

The government has a role to play in the form of tax subsidies to builders who build green.

Older buildings could also be retrofitted with more energy efficient windows and HVAC replacements.

Construction material selection, the location of the building site to take advantage of energy efficiencies, using renewable energy sources, becoming carbon neutral, a water reduction strategy, and an energy efficiency plan are all ways to make the space better for its residents and the community, and more profitable for the investors.

Learn more about their important work at BlaqkDiamondGroup.com

Interview notes from the show:

 

Pedram:

Hey, welcome back to The Urban Monk. Pedram here with Chris Jafarieh who is doing some amazing work in the development of commercial space to be non toxic and green. We spend most of our time indoors, huffing paint and carpet glue and all the stuff that’s making us sick. He has found and identified a solution in how to change the way we finance and to change the way we build the blocks that we live in here, so that we can do so healthily and it’s going to make a huge impact in energy and health. Enjoy the show.

Chris:

It’s our understanding of, “Wow, wait a second. Sick buildings are out. This why they’re out and this is what we want to do to change that.” Our attention is on Black Diamond. Green Diamond is the philosophy.

We're Not Designed To Stay Inside All Day -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

The Beginning Of Green Diamond

Pedram:

You’ve pioneered this division now within Black Diamond. You’ve been doing this real estate thing for a while, and so now Green Diamond is this division that’s doing some really interesting work in the space of green building. How did this come about and how’d you break it out from the main thing into the green thing?

Chris:

I think for the last several years, following how commercial real estate development works and analytics behind commercial real estate and seeing all the progression that’s made in the local and international environments, we’ve noticed a trend, whether … A trendy philosophy was that a lot of the large, corporate-type image companies wanted to be in sustainable real estate for them and for all of their occupants. For us, it was just kind of a passion project. I was in cahoots with my cousin David Wolfe, who’s a well known author, speaker, philanthropist, health advisor. We’re always wondering how we can get together and work together.

He has shaped my understanding of the natural, metaphysical, physical world, and in turn, I wanted to work with him on something that I can support and get behind with passion, not just on a business acumen. I love development. I love commercial real estate. I love the finance world. It’s something that I’ve been doing the last 10 years, if not longer. After a nice trip in Kauai and spending some time on the land, we came under the conclusion that David’s popularity and global reach had reached a level that we’ve never expected, and that this is an angle of our development projects and our commercial real estate arms that we can collide forces and use his global reach with our ability to get these projects up and running, and that’s how Green Diamond was formed under the umbrella of Black Diamond Group, which is our commercial real estate firm.

The Disconnect Between Green Building and Financing

Pedram:

Which you’ve been doing successfully for a long time, and so you’re good at financing buildings, putting up buildings, and making that happen. For our viewers and listeners, we did an early interview with Dave Wolfe about the sick home, sick building, and what that means and what that’s about. Let’s draw a circle around that. Our commercial development of buildings is using non-sustainable development strategies and all of that. The way the financing works nudges in that direction, and once you’re in that building, it’s less healthy to be in there. I’d love to unpack that a little bit, identify the problem.

Chris:

Sure. You kind of explained it. It seems that we got into a pattern, and the pattern started in the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s, and carried on into developments even today in certain parts of this country and throughout the world. What we notice is that we have different stakeholders coming into a development that are completely unattached with each other and unattached with that specific environment where these buildings are being built. All the way down from the developer, all the way up to the hedge fund manager, to the local officials, to the architects, to the engineers, to the design capabilities. A lot of these different parties that are so instrumental in building a project cohesively are actually so far apart in the process.

I noticed that on some of our development projects and looking at some of the projects that we were financing, and in turn, what happens is that there’s a lot of suffering that goes on within the building as far as it running to perfection on energy consumption, chemical limitations … Different parts of the production of the building were cut off and not running together fluidly. The main disconnection pattern that came into my eyes was that most developments are funded by hedge funds that have nothing to do with that given area, and all they care about, mainly, is their fiduciary obligation, is to make as much profit as possible and to move on to the next project. That seemed to be the main flaw that was causing the issues that we keep seeing with the sick building syndrome.

Every Building Has A Lifecycle We're Not Designed To Stay Inside All Day -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

What’s happening is they’re investing into these buildings, and with no foresight or no care of how this building’s going to perform 5, 10, 15, 30 years, 50 years from now. Every building has a lifecycle. It’s not just build the building up, get it going, have occupants move in, and move on to another one. There’s a whole responsibility that needs to be taking place when these buildings are designed and built. It’s a very thorough thought process that needs to go into this.

Pedram:

The guys that are funding the building are getting a quick burn and turn, getting some sort of return on it …

Chris:

Internal rate of return.

Pedram:

IRR, and then saying, “Okay, good. We got our money out. We’re out. Now who buys the thing?” Then, who’s stuck with it is the question.

Chris:

Yeah. They sell it off to different real estate investment trusts, to different private investment groups. Sometimes they keep them on their balance sheet for a year or two and send them off. There’s a whole multitude of ways that we’ve been seeing this reoccurring. Every single way has been showing that there hasn’t been a significant approach to really building and designing a building that’s going to withstand a lot of the issues that we’re seeing today with sick buildings. Again, that’s a problem, and that’s the code that we seem to have cracked.

What Constitutes a “Sick” Building?

Pedram:

Before we get into the cracking of the code, which is exciting news for humanity here, what makes a building sick? What chemicals? Is it the air, the ventilation, all of the above?

Chris:

All of the above. Initially, we thought it was the chemicals. It was the raw materials. It was the displacement of natural resources and animals and whatnot, but when you look into it more, it’s unbelievable. You have all these large, huge cities that are being ran by coal plants, petroleum plants. What’s energizing all of these buildings? What’s giving the power to them? Something has to burn somewhere in the distance to keep these lights on, to keep these big, massive air conditioning systems on, to keep these elevators and escalators and subways and all these different types of power that’s needed. Something’s burning. CO2’s emitting. Carbon emissions are extremely high from this. This is a problem. 49% of our carbon emissions in this country, believe it or not, are coming from buildings. That’s taking into effect cars and everything else. It’s coming from buildings. That’s a problem.

Pedram:

Once you saw this, and there’s a lot of habitat and all these types of things in urban planning. There’s a lot of ways that we’ve been dumb about … Unless people stop having babies, we need to keep building housing.

Chris:

Absolutely.

Pedram:

This is coming from a guy who’s slanted liberal. I’m sorry. People need to live somewhere.

Chris:

Absolutely.

To Keep Your Lights On, Something Has To Burn -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

How Do We Make Urban Planning More Green?

Pedram:

When we have this urban planning thing in front of us, we need to think that through and say, “Okay, what’s the best place to do it?” Now, how the hell do we power this? What are we doing? Can we go solar? Can we go wind on the outside? Can the buildings be more efficient? How do we do it?

Chris:

It’s a combination of everything there. You want to hit it on all sides. Solar’s not going to be our complete answer. Wind is not going to be our complete answer, but these are solutions to a big problem overall. We want to hit it on all levels. Whether it’s the design of the building, the location of how we position the building with the sun, solar panels that rotate on the roof, rainwater capture … Again, a building is toxic for multiple reasons. For energy, for waste conception, raw materials … We want to hit it on all levels. Today, with the technology that’s out there, with the minds that are out there, international groups that are out there that have been running in this industry for a while now. I’ve been studying them and learning who they are and speaking with them. There are so many different opportunities here that we can use to keep our energy consumptions at a minimal, and that, again, starts with the right philosophy and the right plan from the beginning.

Pedram:

Going in with the right philosophy and plan is something that most of us can do. I can go in there and be like, “Hey guys, I want to do this,” but I don’t know how the financing works, so I’ll go in and then all of a sudden someone’ll be like, “No kid, that’s not how things work. This dude buys it, and this costs too much. We’re not going to be able to do it.” How do we hack the financial out in all this?

Chris:

We’ve got to show them it’s not just a moral case to build green. It’s a business case to build green. That’s the key right there, because ultimately, there’s going to have to be profit margins. People are going to have to make money. At the same time, things like what we want to do is we want to create our own capital. We call it conscious capital. We want to raise our own dollars. We want our own people to be investing in the built environment that we live in. I don’t want some fund manager 2,000, 3,000, 4,000 miles away taking what’s mine in my environment so they can make a profit and leave us more exposed and leave our children more exposed. It’s creating different debt instruments, it’s really showing a business case for building green. By cutting energy costs, we’re saving a lot of money on the bottom line for our investors.

If you’re cutting energy by 80%, what is that doing to your bottom line on an annual basis? Again, we want our investors to stay with these projects long term. If we’re going to see these projects once these properties are stabilized, we want the right conscious investors to come in and take them on. There’s a lot of real estate investment trusts out there. These are groups of investors that have bought multiple types of assets and put them all under one umbrella, that understand what sustainable works. What better representation than a real estate investment trust that owns 30, 40 properties on their balance sheet? They’re showing us that they want sustainable properties. They see the savings because of the energy consumption, because of the waste consumption, and how those savings have contributed to their respective groups making more money.

Is Green Building Always More Expensive?

Pedram:

How long? How long does it take? I’m assuming it’s going to be more expensive to build the right way in green on the front end. How long before you can-

Chris:

I’ll stop you right there. That’s not accurate.

Pedram:

Great. I love that.

Chris:

Yeah, it’s just like any other technology, any new concept. When it’s fairly new, it’s going to be pricier, because you’ve got to bring in a group. They’ve got to come do their own design. It’s going to take a little bit more time.

Pedram:

Materials cost.

Energy Efficiency Saves Money And Lives - Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

Chris:

Materials cost is going to cost a little bit more, but once we tip the balance of the supply and demand change, these things are changing, and they’re changing right now. Look at cities like San Francisco, cities like Pasadena. You can’t even get permits for buildings through city council without having at least some type of sustainability aspect to your project. They’re demanding it right now, and this is what we want. This is what we need. This is exactly the direction that needs to be taken because we don’t really have a choice at this point.

Pedram:

There’s legislative mandates, which is great and I’m all for it. There’s also market demands. A LEED certified building, a green building, is demanding more rent and these marquee tenants are having to pay it.

Chris:

Absolutely. It’s very interesting, and I thank God for this. Trendy has worked out very well from here for this matter, and our environment is thanking us for it. LEED is Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. It’s a rating agency that was developed by, actually, a friend of ours, David Gottfried, among other of his constituents. They developed a rating agency to rate how well your building saves energy, saves waste consumption, does all the different levels of sustainability. Your question was …

Pedram:

The tenants that go in. I would pay higher rent if I knew I wasn’t getting poisoned in some room.

Chris:

Absolutely. Let’s say you have a SalesForce office of two, three thousand employees. If they’re in a green building with good lighting, with good circulation, they know they’re in a sustainable building, the brick and mortar’s out, the asbestos is out, you’re going to get a lot better employee production as opposed to something that’s going to be a lot more toxic, something that’s darker … That’s where these corporate companies are going. Their branding is representing who they are as a global firm, and they want to stand with us as far as green development is concerned, and it’s paying off dividends for them all around.

Pedram:

There’s also recruitment aspect to this, where the labor pool, and this is something that I didn’t really understand, because you just assume there’s people everywhere and everything’s so damn crowded that population overgrowth and this, that and the other … The Baby Boomer thing has come and gone out of the workforce, and the Millennial generation coming in, there’s not as many people to fill the jobs, so it’s become a much more competitive landscape. Someone wants wellness, someone wants a green building … These people that they’re trying to recruit into their companies actually are demanding this kind of stuff, which is also a consumer sentiment and an employee sentiment, which is great.

Chris:

It’s awesome. It’s happening right now, particularly in the Bay Area. If you go all the way down from Silicon Valley all the way up to the tops of Marin County, most of these firms are bringing in the right people that are demanding exactly what you’re saying, because it’s the culture now. People want to be healthy. People want to be enthusiastic going to work. People want to know that they’re creating a situation for people to produce and to really take things to the next level in their careers and their health. It’s incredible. You have a lot of these campuses that are being built right now, physical education is one of the main components. Spiritual education. This is the climate that we’re in right now. Thank God for it.

Tax Subsidies For Green Building

Pedram:

Yeah, I was going to say. Took a while, but we finally turned that corner. Oh, those ’80s. On the front end, we have prices starting to come down. We have some efficiencies, and we can start to get … There’s mandates and all that, but let’s just say it’s even more expensive to build green still, and that’s changing. If you could hold the asset long enough …

Chris:

I’ll just jump in right here. Another thing that we’re looking at I mentioned earlier is that the cities get involved is that we work with local and state officials, federal officials as well, about getting tax subsidies. When you start a development process, one of the major capital expenditures that you need to look at is the go in cost and the tax cost. Right now, a lot of local cities, a lot of counties are encouraging green developments, and the way they’re encouraging it for private investors such as ourselves and our groups and whatnot is they’ll cut the tax expenses, which very much empower us to be able to build these projects, because we’re getting a clear savings, which any other carryover money would go towards building green. It creates a very solid balance. These are things that we want to get more involved with. We want to start really working with the local officials and whatnot.

Pedram:

They create the incentives. They give you tax breaks, so it actually pencils out on the front end to go green. Then, what percentage … You threw a number like 80%. People saving up to 80% on power bills and these types of things by having energy efficient buildings?

Chris:

Absolutely. Water … Because it goes all the way around. Water consumption, some of the new technology for waste removal is removing water almost altogether. It’s incredible. You have trash. You have energy. All of these things end up, especially the larger facility you go. We’re seeing savings on average anywhere between 50 up to 80%. It just really depends on how far they’re willing to go as far as the type of technology they’re using. There are buildings out there that are considered living, breathing ecosystems. It’s very fascinating.

Pedram:

There’s a book that talked about the original humans being cave dwellers and how this urban metropolis … We all kind of lived in caves on cliffs, and there’s trees everywhere.

Chris:

Genius.

Making Being Inside Feel More Like Being Outside

Pedram:

Genius. There’s a lot of movement in this direction. I’ve seen some interesting things where it’s like, they capture sunlight with prisms and chuck it around inside so there’s actual natural light inside these huge skyscrapers. This isn’t futuristic. We have this now.

Chris:

No, we’ve been having this technology for a while. It’s been right in front of our face. We had it as children, and it’s becoming fun. That’s the exciting part of it, is that you leave it up to the imagination for us to be able to create something that’s tangible, that makes sense. What’s better than that? That’s the best ever.

Nature Needs To Be Brought Indoors -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

Pedram:

How much time do we spend indoors at these places we call work? 8 hours a day?

Chris:

A lot.

Pedram:

5 days a week?

Chris:

A lot.

Pedram:

Most of our life.

Chris:

Yes, absolutely. Just think about the difference it will make for the health of your employees and for the health of your fellow workers. It makes such a big difference. We’re humans. Let’s be real here. We’re not designed to be inside man made structures. That’s the reality of it. We’re supposed to be running around on the beach, in the mountains, in the fresh air. If we are not designing these buildings to have the proper circulation, the fundamental energy of being outside, which in effect is what a green building is, we’re doing a major disservice, we’re creating a lot of sickness within the building. It’s just bad all around. This is very important.

Another thing I would like to add is less is more when it comes to building a sustainable building. The less materials you use, the better. We don’t need all that rebar, all that concrete, all that wood, all that lead. All of that’s out. The new technologies are showing that it’s glass and steel, and everything that we can fill in in between to make that structure stand. That’s a big deal.

How Can We Make Existing Structures More Green?

Pedram:

We have new buildings, which are obviously moving us in the right direction, and there’s people that are building in this way, and there’s people that go back, kick it old school, and build the way they used to, in burn and turn. We’re trying to influence the new buildings. What about old buildings? Can we go retrofit them? Do we got to demo them? What needs to happen with the toxic buildings that a lot of us are stuck in?

Chris:

I think that’s a great question. I think it’s really going to depend on the building. I can’t answer that on a general term. Obviously, retrofit is incredible, especially when it comes to the windows. What’s interesting is most windows on buildings that have not been built for sustainability are basically energy wasters. They’re losing all the energy as far as in the summertime, if it’s hot and you want to keep it cool. That’s not keeping the cool, and vice versa. It’s not trapping the heat. Retrofitting windows is very important. Changing the paint tile, VOC free paint, we want to stay away from, those chemicals are extremely hazardous. Replacing the HVAC systems. HVAC systems is about 25, 30% of a building’s energy. Most of those, in regular buildings, are 90% wasteful. 90%. That is incredible.

Pedram:

Wow. Is that because of just the piping isn’t right? What makes them so wasteful?

Chris:

They build them so massive, they do not disperse them correctly. Most HVAC systems, I think you’ve seen them before in old hotels or you see them in the garage, and they’ve got tons of dust around them and they’re cranking all the time, because they got to feed the beast. Those are pumping out air conditioning to hundreds of vacant rooms, hundreds of vacant lobbies all the time. There’s no rhyme or reasons. It’s incredible. The reason why a lot of these buildings are doing that is because they’re all owned by a large corporation who is not specifically analyzing each property’s energy consumption, and puts it all under one global financial scale. It’s horrible. I want to save them money. We need to design systems that are more efficient and less chemicals. That’s essentially what it is. It’s really about efficiency here. Being smart.

Pedram:

If you’re listening to this, saying “How the hell does this apply to me,” is that means less smog in your air and less mercury in your sushi.

Chris:

Essentially.

Reducing Energy Consumption Through Green Building

Pedram:

You’re burning coal to power all this crap, right? You’re saying 500% of our consumption can be optimized and become a lot more efficient, and then we can start moving the energy grid to more sustainable things. We can make a really big dent in the way we generate energy and the way we use energy for 50% of our consumption in this country, and we’re the biggest polluter.

Chris:

Pedram, we can make a massive dent. It’s very interesting. If you look at the actual analytics, the evidence points that just a slight difference in the next 10 years can shift our carbon emissions completely. This has to happen. We’re in an area right now in our environment where a lot of our systems are failing drastically. This is very critical.

Pedram:

We seem to be tilting over and having a shift in the political will, which sounds great. There’s cities, municipalities, they’re doing this stuff.

Chris:

Yes.

Pedram:

One of the things that I find incredibly relevant for the optimism of the future is you guys have cracked the code on this financial model, because business is business and if it pencils out, it pencils out. Corporations just go for what they do and there’s externalities and all that. There’s a business case which takes the powerful force of capitalism and aligns it with ecology, with sustainable development. From finance all the way through holding this thing, just walk us through a little bit of the life cycle of how you have to change the finance of this so that it makes sense.

Chris:

Yes. Essentially, we understand now that the power is back with the people. What I mean by that is that if we want to build it to be sustainable, we have to finance it ourselves, with groups, like-minded individuals, and we got to show and really illustrate that there is a business case to building green. Your financial model will be healthier with a sustainable building. It’s not top secret. It’s not rocket science. It’s very simple. If I can save your energy costs by, let’s say, 25%, what will that do to your bottom line on an annual basis? Most finance instruments are 5 to 10 year programs. Do the math. Multiply that by 5 or 10. Show the savings. It’s a no-brainer.

Now the evidence is there that we can show this to the banks, to the lenders. The buildings that have been green that we’ve been reading and understanding have been out there for 10+ years. We have a couple of them we’re reviewing right now that are in Seattle. We have a couple in LA, a couple in San Francisco, a couple in Germany. The evidence is there. The statistics are there. It’s not something that we’re making up. We have no agenda. We can show them that on a 10 year return, saves them a drastic amount of money. You save 10% on a financial instrument on a 10 year basis, that changes the whole structure in how you put that deal together. It’s incredible.

Then, at the same time, with our network, with what I’m doing with my cousin David, what I’m doing with you, ultimately our next couple projects we want to finance ourselves. We want to hold onto these projects. We want to hold onto these assets after they stabilize. These are going to be beautiful, classic green developments that inspire, that help people, that replace any possibility of a sick building being there. These are going to be built regardless. We might as well build them green, and we’re excited to do that.

49% of Carbon Emissions Come From Buildings -Chris Jafarieh (@BlaqkDG) via @PedramShojai

Do Green Buildings Have A Greater Long-Term Value?

Pedram:

There’s something in there that I want to unpack real quickly, which is you have two projects side by side. One is built the old way, which over time is going to cost more money in just operations. Then the green one, which saves you money in the long run and definitely makes a business case for the 10 year performer or whatever.

Chris:

Sure.

Pedram:

Then, when you’re looking at these two assets side by side, same square footage, same everything, same everything, I’m assuming that the green building will hold its value if not more side by side for someone who wants to buy it?

Chris:

Exponentially. Almost 40% more. That’s the statistics right now if you take a look at LEED buildings versus regular sick buildings. They’re trading at a rate of about 40% more per square footage. It’s incredible.

Pedram:

Same thing. It’s got gourmet thing on it. People will pay more.

Chris:

Absolutely. They’ll pay more rent, thus creating a higher value when you want to purchase the property.

Pedram:

At the end of the day, the value is based on what the perceived value in the rent is that the occupants want, and then since the occupants want this, the value of the building goes up.

Chris:

Absolutely.

Pedram:

This, to me, is really interesting, because it goes back to the history of organics.

Chris:

Yes.

Pedram:

We didn’t have an organic industry. There was a few people that pushed it ahead and said, “Look, I choose this. I’m willing to pay more for it.” Those early adopters basically forced the hand into … It’s like a $8.5 billion industry and going gangbusters, and it’s basically taking over the way we do things. Why? Because people wanted it. Now if you’re in a business, if you’re running the show somewhere and you want to do the right thing for your employees, you want to do the right thing for your people and the community and the environment and everything, let alone your pocket book, you start wanting to get into these buildings. You start nudging your way into these buildings. Bring the demand up.

If you work for a company, start nudging your HR and saying, “Listen, what can we do to green up this building?” As that demand and that sentiment goes up, it starts to drive the industry. It brings down costs, and then 10 years, 15 years from now, fast forward, we’ve got ourselves a real environmental solution and we live in healthy buildings with fresh air and good sunlight, and it just makes good sense.

How To Follow Green Diamond’s Work In Green Building

Chris:

You’ve just hit it right on the nail. It all comes down to the consumer, to the tenant, to the occupants. They’re the ones that demand the developers and the owners of these properties to build them green. Again, it’s a matter of getting the word out there and driving that energy and having everyone understand exactly how important this issue is.

Pedram:

I love it. I love it. You are doing such great work. I’m obviously following. We’re buddies, and we’re in cahoots to save the world here, so that’s not a conspiracy. Everyone’s just trying to help. Where can people follow the work of Black Diamond and Green Diamond and how you’re doing this, because this is a case study that’s a growing body of evidence supporting what we’re talking about.

Chris:

Absolutely, and I just wanted to add that we have one of our trademark assets that are going up in Palo Alto, California, a couple blocks from Stanford University. This is a Class A, mixed use property, mixed use meaning office, retail, and residential components. That’s capturing about 12 components of green sustainability aspects to it. Organic rooftop garden, beautiful HVAC systems, raw materials, the solar, the whole 9 yards. Charging stations, everything. This is a great asset. This should be ready in the next couple months. We’re really happy and excited about that.

You can get in touch with us online through BlaqkDiamondGroup.com. That’s B-L-A-Q-K Diamond group dot com. Our Facebook as well. Our partner David Wolfe, I’m sure a lot of people know who he is. He’s our partner, and working with you on everything that you’re doing. The time is now. We’re ready to move forward. They had their way. It’s time.

Pedram:

Humanity’s gone through its adolescence. We’re growing up. We’re figuring it out. We’re going to put some cameras on that building. We’re going to show what this thing looks like. It’s a prototype for how we can do buildings in the future, and it isn’t some sort of decadent, gourmet, overexpenditure to say “Oh well this is cute, but it doesn’t pencil out.” It pencils out, so it is the future.

Chris:

Yes.

Pedram:

Man, I’m excited. Let’s get after this. Let’s fix the world.

Chris:

All right. Cool. Awesome.

Pedram:

Thanks for being here.

Chris:

Thank you so much.

Pedram:

Now, you might be thinking to yourself, “How does this apply to me? I’m not a real estate developer.” The consumer drives the demand, which drives the market. If you’re in a work environment, start talking to the people that are in charge of this to say, “Can we get some non-toxic carpet? Can we get some more lights? More VOC plants.” Start driving the narrative in that direction. They want you to be happy. They will get you what you want if you get enough people asking for it, so start driving an internal revolution in your company, in your workplace, which will eventually get you to be exposed to less poison, more oxygen, and we’re going to make the world a better place.

Enjoy this, share this. I’ll see you next week.

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